Pollyanna-ism

It’s not trite, this waking to wonder, giving thanks for all this.

Thanks isn’t shallow Pollyanna-ism.  Didn’t Chesterton suggest that?

“I would maintain that thanks are the highest form of thought, and that gratitude is happiness doubled by wonder.”

And I wonder if this is why thanks is the highest form of thought–because this is always the right order of things: Us laid low.  Before God on High.

Ann Voskamp

“Thanks isn’t shallow Pollyanna-ism.”

My dear, sweet husband occasionally points out to me my tendency toward negativity.  I call it realism.  You know the bit.  I’m not a Pollyanna.  I don’t want to be a Pollyanna, I say.  Naive.  That’s what it is.

A few weeks ago, we were sitting in our living room on a Saturday.  My favorite day–when we’re all together.  Chris looked out the window and said, “Is it snowing?!”  You have to understand that I keep up with my weather app like it’s my job.  For it to be snowing and me to not know it was coming is rare.  Sure enough, it was snowing.  I got so excited.  I love snow.  “It’s going to stick, I know it!”  Chris wasn’t so sure.  “Why do you always have to be so negative about snow?” I asked in frustration.  Then it hits me.  And him.  I’m more than willing to be overly and unrealistically positive when it comes to snow.  Why only snow?

When I started Ann Voskamp’s “One Thousand Gifts” daily devotional book, I was excited, but skeptical.  Ann writes in a way that my brain doesn’t usually operate.  It was right after I had been explaining to Chris this disconnect with her writing that I opened the book and was blown away.  Oh, sweet Jesus.  He works that way, you know.  My brain can operate that way–it just hasn’t in a while.

Ann challenges us to be thankful.  To find joy and grace and beauty in the mundane.  To recognize that being thankful in the little things isn’t being a Pollyanna–it’s being like a child–ever filled with wonder.

And the Kingdom belongs to such as these.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s